Posts Tagged extracellular matrix

september 2015: 1

Building Muscle
“Lab-grown muscle fibers offer new muscular dystrophy model”
Future applications include other degenerative muscle diseases.
Harvard Medical School News — August 3, 2015

Fat in the Family?
Study could lead to therapeutics that boost metabolism
Harvard Medical School News — August 20, 2015

UGA’s Regenerative Bioscience Center collaborates in development of brain-friendly interfaces
“…proof of concept that extracellular matrix can be used to ensheathe a functioning electrode without the use of any other foreign or synthetic materials…. the extracellular matrix derived electrodes adapted to the mechanical properties of brain tissue and were capable of acquiring neural recordings from the brain cortex.”
Regenerative Bioscience Center, University of Georgia — August 5, 2015

We transformed living cells into tiny lasers
Harvard Medical School Dermatology/The Conversation, American pilot, July 27, 2015

Alzheimer’s research

Immune mechanisms of synapse loss in health and disease (YouTube lecture)
Beth Stevens, Broad Institute/Boston Children’s Hospital —  July 8, 2015
Her lab is “using a combination of live imaging, molecular, biochemical, and neuroanatomical approaches to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which immune molecules and immune cells called microglia prune synapses in health and disease. Her recent work demonstrates [how] immune-related pruning pathways mediate aberrant synapse loss and dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease) and neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism.

Iron-containing inflammatory cells seen in Alzheimer’s brains
“Using high-field MRI technology and staining techniques, scientists have located inflamed, iron-containing scavenger cells in a memory-formation structure in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients who died”
Stanford Medicine News Center — July 20, 2015

something completely different

Why the long face? Horses and humans share facial expressions
“Horses and humans share surprisingly similar facial expressions”
University of Sussex — August 5, 2015

 

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